Common Skin Rashes to Know and Identify 

 A rash can be defined as a change in the skin’s appearance. Rashes are common and can have many causes, such as a drug reaction, a viral or bacterial infection, or a chemical or a new soap or lotion reaction. Food allergies can cause a rash, too, and these are particularly common in infants who develop eczema as a reaction to a milk protein allergy. Here are some common rashes to know:

 Drug Allergy

 This type of allergy can present itself as an itchy red rash, often over large parts of the body, that can appear anywhere from hours to weeks after exposure to a particular drug. A reaction can occur even if it’s a drug that has been taken in the past. A drug-induced allergy rash can often be mild, fading on its own after discontinuing the medication. Still, it can also be life-threatening if it’s accompanied by hives, elevated heart rate, and difficulty breathing. If these symptoms persist accompany a drug allergy rash, the user should seek medical treatment immediately. 

 Eczema

 Often confused with psoriasis, this condition looks like white scales over red, irritated skin that may be greasy and itchy. Things including stress and diet can cause flare-ups. Sometimes, the cause is unknown. Eczema can come and go. Some people outgrow it; others have it for life. Treatment ranges from no treatment, depending upon the severity, to special creams containing steroids. Other non-steroidal creams are available. 

 Psoriasis

 This rash appears as a red, thickened patches of skin covered with silvery scales. It’s usually itchy. The skin may break open and bleed. Psoriasis is a chronic condition usually first appearing in the mid-teens to early adulthood. It’s uncommon in young children. It has an autoimmune cause that is poorly understood.  This illness can be treated by creams, steroids, methotrexate, and biological medications targeted at the body’s immune system. 

 Contact dermatitis

Contact dermatitis often results from skin contact with an allergen. The skin will be red, itchy, scaly, and raw and may ooze fluid from small blisters. There will be a distinct border of normal skin touching the inflamed skin area where the allergen contact occurred. The best treatment is avoiding the allergen, but hydrocortisone cream and oatmeal baths may help ease the discomfort. 

The Correlation Between the Affordable Care Act and Emergency Department Visits

Emergency_roomThe University of California published a study, titled “Relationship of Affordable Care Act Implementation to Emergency Department Utilization Among Young Adults,” which found that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) extended eligibility for health insurance for young adults aged 19 to 25 years. It’s fairly unclear how expanded coverage has changed health care behavior, as well as how it promotes efficiency for emergency department services.

Researchers indicated that the objective of the research was to use population level emergency department data to characterize changes in diagnoses noticed by emergency departments among young adults since the incorporation of ACA dependent coverage expansion. Difference-in-differences analysis of 2oo9 to 2011 ED visits from New York, Florida, and California was performed, and they utilized all-capture administrative data to calculate just how the use of emergency department services have changed for clinical categories following the implementation of ACA provisions among those aged 19 to 25, compared to those slightly older (26 to 31 years).

Approximately 10,158,254 emergency department visits made by 4,734,409 patients were analyzed, and after implementation of the 2010 ACA provision, it was found that there was a .5 percent emergency department decreased for younger adults per 1,000, compared to the older group. Young adults’ rates and rate and risk of visits didn’t know change relative to the slightly older group following the implementation of the ACA. With that said, young adults’ emergency department visit significantly increased by 2.6 percent and there was a 4.8 percent increase in visits for diseases of the circulatory systems (eg, nonspecific chest pain).

There was a 3.7 percent decrease for pregnancy-related diagnoses and diseases of the skin (eg, cellulitis, abscess), compared to the 3.1 percent for the older group. The results indicated that coverage increases have kept young people out of the emergency department for conditions that are being cared for elsewhere. Conclusively, the report established, “As EDs face capacity challenges, these results are encouraging and offer insight into what could be expected under further insurance expansions from health care reform.”